Opening in Las Vegas, November 18, 2016

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Lots of high profile openings this week, including the launch of another J.K. Rowling empire.

That’s Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (65), which if I understand correctly Rowling published as mainly a picture book. Well, they’re turning that into five movies. It’s the same world as Harry Potter only in New York in the ’20s. Joe Webb, I hope we get a review from you, because you know this stuff best. Moira Macdonald: “So there’s room for improvement in the “Fantastic Beasts” universe; perhaps we’ll see it in the next installment or two. Meanwhile — even if you, like me, are a bit Pottered out and wish Rowling would devote herself instead to her marvelous Cormoran Strike detective-novel series (magic comes in many forms) — it’s still a pleasure to revisit the author’s world.”

A teen movie, with a title taken from a Stevie Nicks song? Could be dreadful (though I’m a Nicks fan, I admit it) but The Edge of Seventeen (77) is getting great reviews. Hailee Steinfeld is the teen. Barry Hertz: “If hell is other people, then high school is a four-year journey through all nine levels of Dante-ish misery. But while most teen-centric films skip over this harsh reality, The Edge of Seventeen embraces it with a refreshing zeal.”

Most of the conversation about Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (53) has been about Ang Lee’s use of 12o frames per second (the usual is 24). But unless you live in L.A. or New York or Hong Kong, you haven’t been able to see that. I read the book, which was fantastic, so I’ll probably end up seeing this despite it’s lackluster reviews. Rodrigo Perez: “Lee’s clearly going for a hyper-realness with these images, but it undermines the drama and the few beats of moving honesty about who we are, duty and sacrifice. Ang Lee is undoubtedly a visionary filmmaker, but the distracting unpleasantness of his movie’s highly attuned visual clarity, makes for an undiscerning and artificial experience the eye just won’t follow.”

We have another example of a boxing movie when boxing has waned to almost nothing as a popular sport in the U.S., which I find fascinating. Bleed for This (62) is a true story about a boxer who came back from a devastating injury. Matt Soller Zeitz: “Bleed for This” starts out like a traditional underdog-fighter-makes-good flick, based on a true story, pivots and becomes something else, then goes back to being traditional.”

 

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About Jackrabbit Slim

Location: Vegas, Baby! I’m much older than the other whippersnappers here, a baby boomer. I tend to be more snobbish about film, disdaining a lot of the multiplex fare for “cinema.” My favorite films: Woody Allen’s oeuvre (up until about 1990), The Godfather, The Graduate, A Hard Day’s Night, Pulp Fiction. Politics: Well, George McGovern was my political hero. I’m also a prickly atheist. Occupation: Poised to be an English teacher in Las Vegas. For many years I was an editor at Penthouse Magazine. My role on this blog seems to be writing lots of reviews and being the resident Oscar maven.

2 responses »

  1. We have another example of a boxing movie when boxing has waned to almost nothing as a popular sport in the U.S., which I find fascinating.

    Yeah, that is curiously fascinating. I’m guessing the success of Creed (and ongoing popularity of the Rocky franchise) has played a part. But it seems one of those examples where Hollywood is years (even decades) out of step with social reality.

  2. Hey, thanks for the shoutout. I saw it on Saturday and immediately rushed home to read the screenplay. I don’t know if I have enough to say about it to warrant a review, though, so I won’t be offended if anyone else wants to jump in.

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